8 Tips for Improving Bootstrap Accessibility

A few years ago, I wrote about my experiences on developing a Bootstrap version 3 project to be fully accessible for people with disabilities. This focussed mostly on how accessible it is in terms of front-end design. (It didn’t cover accessibility in terms of screen readers, as that’s a whole other story.)

While I could see that the developers behind Bootstrap were making an effort, there were a few areas where this popular UI library fell short. I could also see that there were issues raised on the project that showed they were actively improving — which is fantastic, considering how approximately 3.6% of websites use Bootstrap.

Recently, Bootstrap version 4 was released, so let’s take a look and see if any of the issues I had in the past have improved.

What We’re Looking For with Design Accessibility

There are a few things to consider when designing a website with accessibility in mind. I believe these improve the user experience for everyone and will likely cover a lot of points you would consider anyway.

Layout

One way to achieve accessibility is by having a clean, easy-to-use layout that looks good on all devices, as well as looking good at a high zoom level. Up to 200% is a good guide.

Bonus points: having front-end code that matches the layout is also good for users who access the Web with a screen reader or by using a keyboard instead of a mouse.

This allows people to use your website easily irrespective of how they’re viewing it.

The post 8 Tips for Improving Bootstrap Accessibility appeared first on SitePoint.


Source: Sitepoint

Rhiana Heath

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